search for



The Association between Muscle Strength and Hyperuricemia in the Healthy Middle-aged Adult in Yangpyeong Province
Korean J Sports Med 2018;36:7-14
Published online March 1, 2018;  https://doi.org/10.5763/kjsm.2018.36.1.7
© 2018 The Korean Society of Sports Medicine.

Dooyong Park1,*, On Lee1, Sang Woong Han2, Mi Kyung Kim3, Bo Youl Choi3, Yeon Soo Kim1,4

1Department of Physical Education, College of Education, Seoul National University, Seoul, 2Divison of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hanyang University Guri Hospital, Guri, 3Department of Preventive Medicine, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul, 4Institute of Sport Science, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea
Correspondence to: Yeon Soo Kim
Department of Physical Education, College of Education, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 08826, Korea
Tel: +82-2-880-7794, Fax: +82-2-880-7794, E-mail: kys0101@snu.ac.kr
*Current affiliation: GC HealthCare, Seongnam, Korea
Received September 29, 2017; Revised December 19, 2017; Accepted December 20, 2017.
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
 Abstract
Purpose: This study aimed to examine the prevalence of hyperuricemia in association with relative grip strength and leg strength in Korean Elderly.
Methods: We studied cross-sectional analysis with 1,894 rural adults (40닋88 years old), who were surveyed for 7 years from 2007 to 2014. Grip strength was measured by using Takei grip strength dynamometer. Leg strength was measured by using Takei leg strength dynamometer. Hyperuricemia was defined by examining serum uric acid concentration (male 돟7 mg/dL, female 돟6 mg/dL). Logistic regression was conducted to evaluate the association of grip strength and leg strength with hyperuricemia (p竊0.05).
Results: Subjects who reported high level of relative grip strength had a significantly lower odds ratio (OR) of hyperuricemia than subjects who reported low level of relative grip strength (OR, 0.37; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.16닋0.84). When it comes to sex, subjects both high relative muscle strength are significantly lower multivariate-adjusted OR of hyperuricemia than subjects both low relative muscle strength in male (OR, 0.52; 95% CI, 0.29닋0.95) and female (OR, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.26닋0.95). Additionally, senior group (age 돟65 years), who have low relative grip strength and high relative leg strength, was only significantly associated with the prevalence of hyperuricemia (OR, 0.43; 95% CI, 0.19닋0.98).
Conclusion: The relationship between hyperuricemia and relative grip strength may be mediated through decreased estimated glomerular filtration ratio. Therefore, muscle strength is important factor in prevention of renal vascular dysfunction which is a risk factor of hyperuricemia, and resistance exercise is needed to improve muscle strength.
Keywords : Exercise, Glomerular filtration rate, Hand strength, Hyperuricemia, Muscle strength
References
  1. Gagliardi AC, Miname MH, Santos RD. Uric acid: a marker of increased cardiovascular risk. Atherosclerosis 2009;202:11-7.
    Pubmed CrossRef
  2. Trifiro G, Morabito P, Cavagna L, et al. Epidemiology of gout and hyperuricaemia in Italy during the years 2005-2009:a nationwide population-based study. Ann Rheum Dis 2013;72:694-700.
    Pubmed CrossRef
  3. Lim S, Shin H, Song JH, et al. Increasing prevalence of metabolic syndrome in Korea: the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey for 1998-2007. Diabetes Care 2011;34:1323-8.
    Pubmed KoreaMed CrossRef
  4. Zimmet P, Magliano D, Matsuzawa Y, Alberti G, Shaw J. The metabolic syndrome: a global public health problem and a new definition. J Atheroscler Thromb 2005;12:295-300.
    Pubmed CrossRef
  5. Newman AB, Kupelian V, Visser M, et al. Strength, but not muscle mass, is associated with mortality in the health, aging and body composition study cohort. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci 2006;61:72-7.
    Pubmed CrossRef
  6. Lauretani F, Russo CR, Bandinelli S, et al. Age-associated changes in skeletal muscles and their effect on mobility: an operational diagnosis of sarcopenia. J Appl Physiol (1985) 2003;95:1851-60.
    Pubmed CrossRef
  7. Visser M, Deeg DJ, Lips P, Harris TB, Bouter LM. Skeletal muscle mass and muscle strength in relation to lowerextremity performance in older men and women. J Am Geriatr Soc 2000;48:381-6.
    Pubmed CrossRef
  8. Visser M, Goodpaster BH, Kritchevsky SB, et al. Muscle mass, muscle strength, and muscle fat infiltration as predictors of incident mobility limitations in well-functioning older persons. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci 2005;60:324-33.
    Pubmed CrossRef
  9. Schaap LA, Pluijm SM, Deeg DJ, et al. Higher inflammatory marker levels in older persons: associations with 5-year change in muscle mass and muscle strength. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci 2009;64:1183-9.
    Pubmed KoreaMed CrossRef
  10. Leong DP, Teo KK. Predicting cardiovascular disease from handgrip strength: the potential clinical implications. Expert Rev Cardiovasc Ther 2015;13:1277-9.
    Pubmed CrossRef
  11. Eknoyan G, Lameire N, Eckardt KU, et al. KDOQI US commentary on the 2012 KDIGO clinical practice guideline for the evaluation and management of CKD: summary of recommendation statements. Kidney Int Suppl 2013;3:5-14.
    Pubmed KoreaMed CrossRef
  12. Johnson RJ, Kang DH, Feig D, et al. Is there a pathogenetic role for uric acid in hypertension and cardiovascular and renal disease? Hypertension 2003;41:1183-90.
    Pubmed CrossRef
  13. Huang C, Niu K, Kobayashi Y, et al. An inverted J-shaped association of serum uric acid with muscle strength among Japanese adult men: a cross-sectional study. BMC Musculoskelet Disord 2013;14:258.
    Pubmed KoreaMed CrossRef
  14. Lawman HG, Troiano RP, Perna FM, Wang CY, Fryar CD, Ogden CL. Associations of relative handgrip strength and cardiovascular disease biomarkers in U.S. adults, 2011-2012. Am J Prev Med 2016;50:677-83.
    Pubmed CrossRef
  15. Bouchard DR, Janssen I. Dynapenic-obesity and physical function in older adults. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci 2010;65:71-7.
    Pubmed CrossRef
  16. Rantanen T, Harris T, Leveille SG, et al. Muscle strength and body mass index as long-term predictors of mortality in initially healthy men. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci 2000;55:M168-73.
    Pubmed CrossRef
  17. Choquette S, Bouchard DR, Doyon CY, Senechal M, Brochu M, Dionne IJ. Relative strength as a determinant of mobility in elders 67-84 years of age. A nuage study: nutrition as a determinant of successful aging. J Nutr Health Aging 2010;14:190-5.
    Pubmed CrossRef
  18. Beavers KM, Beavers DP, Serra MC, Bowden RG, Wilson RL. Low relative skeletal muscle mass indicative of sarcopenia is associated with elevations in serum uric acid levels:findings from NHANES III. J Nutr Health Aging 2009;13:177-82.
    Pubmed CrossRef
  19. Taylor AC, McCartney N, Kamath MV, Wiley RL. Isometric training lowers resting blood pressure and modulates autonomic control. Med Sci Sports Exerc 2003;35:251-6.
    Pubmed CrossRef
  20. Febbraio MA, Pedersen BK. Muscle-derived interleukin-6:mechanisms for activation and possible biological roles. FASEB J 2002;16:1335-47.
    Pubmed CrossRef
  21. Hoffman T, Stauffer RW, Jackson AS. Sex difference in strength. Am J Sports Med 1979;7:265-7.
    Pubmed CrossRef
  22. Kozakai R, Ando F, Kim HY, Yuki A, Otsuka R, Shimokata H. Sex-differences in age-related grip strength decline: a 10year longitudinal study of community-living middle-aged and older Japanese. J Phys Fit Sports Med 2016;5:87-94.
    CrossRef
  23. DeSouza CA, Shapiro LF, Clevenger CM, et al. Regular aerobic exercise prevents and restores age-related declines in endothelium-dependent vasodilation in healthy men. Circulation 2000;102:1351-7.
    Pubmed CrossRef
  24. Alvarez-Lario B, Macarron-Vicente J. Uric acid and evolution. Rheumatology (Oxford) 2010;49:2010-5.
    Pubmed CrossRef