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Effect of Ultramarathon on the Anterior Pituitary and Thyroid Hormones
Korean J Sports Med 2018;36:214-220
Published online December 1, 2018;  https://doi.org/10.5763/kjsm.2018.36.4.214
© 2018 The Korean Society of Sports Medicine.

Kyung-A Shin1, Young-Joo Kim2

1Department of Clinical Laboratory Science, Shinsung University, Dangjin,
2Department of Exercise Rehabilitation Welfare, Sungshin University, Seoul, Korea
Correspondence to: Young-Joo Kim
Department of Exercise Rehabilitation Welfare, Sungshin University, Bomun-ro 34da-gil, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 02844, Korea
Tel: +82-2-920-7942, Fax: +82-2-920-7942, E-mail: kyj87@sungshin.ac.kr
Received October 15, 2018; Revised November 23, 2018; Accepted November 26, 2018.
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
 Abstract
Purpose: The purpose of this research is to study changes in pituitary hormone in anterior lobe and thyroid hormone before, after, and during recovery time in severe 100 km ultramarathon.
Methods: Healthy middle-aged runners (age, 52.0짹4.8 years) participated in the test. Grade exercise test is done, and then blood is taken from those participants before and after completing 100 km ultramarathon at the intervals of 24 hours (1 day), 72 hours (3 days), and 120 hours (5 days) to analyze their luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4), and free thyroxine (Free T4).
Results: For LH, it decreased more significantly at 100 km than pre-race. However, after 1 day result increased more than that of 100 km. At 3 days, it was significantly higher than pre-race and 100 km, recovering at 5 days. In terms of FSH, it decreased at 100 km, 1 day, and 3 days more than pre-race but recovered at 5 days. TSH was higher at 1 day and 5 days compared to pre-race. T3 was only higher at 100 km than pre-race. T4 was higher till 5 days at 100 km than pre-race. Free T4 increased more significantly at 100 km than pre-race.
Conclusion: In terms of severe long distance running, LH and FSH which belong to hormone from anterior lobe as well as T3, T4, and Free T4 which belong to thyroid hormone showed their variation within the standard range. However, TSH showed abnormal increase from enhanced concentration of blood after marathon becoming hyper-activation even during the recovery period.
Keywords : Follicle-stimulating hormone, Luteinizing hormone, Thyroid hormones, Triiodothyronine, Running
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