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Effects of Reduced Plantar Cutaneous Sensation on Static Postural the Kinematic Strategy Control in Individuals with or without Chronic Ankle Instability
Korean J Sports Med 2019;37:75-83
Published online September 1, 2019;  https://doi.org/10.5763/kjsm.2019.37.3.75
© 2019 The Korean Society of Sports Medicine.

Tae Kyu Kang1,2, Chang Young Kim1,2, Byong Hun Kim1,2, Hee Seong Jeong1,2, Sung Cheol Lee1,2, Sae Yong Lee1,2

1Department of Physical Education, Yonsei University, Seoul, 2Yonsei Institute of Sports Science and Exercise Medicine (YISSEM), Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea
Correspondence to: Sae Yong Lee
Department of Physical Education and Yonsei Institute of Sports Science and Exercise Medicine (YISSEM), Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 03722, Korea
Tel: +82-2-2123-6189, Fax: +82-2-2123-8375, E-mail: sylee1@yonsei.ac.kr

*This research was partially supported by the Graduate School of Yonsei University Research Scholarship Grants in 2017.
Received April 9, 2019; Revised July 26, 2019; Accepted July 29, 2019.
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
 Abstract
Purpose: To investigate the alteration of lower extremity movement during maintaining balance test with their eyes closed in chronic ankle instability (CAI) patients compared to healthy group with and without plantar cutaneous sensation.
Methods: Ten healthy volunteers (age, 23.40짹2.22 years; height, 165.42짹6.67 cm; weight, 60.93짹13.42 kg) and 10 CAI patients (age, 23.90짹2.56 years; height, 166.89짹10.50 cm; weight, 67.43짹12.96 kg), were recruited. Subjects immersed both feet in an ice water for 10 minutes and performed three trials of a single-leg stance balance test with their eyes closed while standing on a force plate for 10 seconds.
Results: CAI group showed increased knee flexion, reduced knee external rotation, and hip internal rotation compared to the healthy group from single-limb stance with eyes closed after diminished plantar cutaneous sensation. However, there was no significant interaction between group and time.
Conclusion: These findings indicate that the postural kinematic analyses revealed that individuals with CAI used different strategy of controlling their lower extremities, which alters transverse plane motion of hip and knee compared to the healthy group in order to compensate for their ankle deficits after freezing the plantar cutaneous.
Keywords : Chronic ankle instability, Plantar cutaneous sensation, Static postural control
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