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The Changes of Contraction Patterns in Trunk Muscles with Multidirectional Tilting Motion on the Dynamic Posturography
Korean J Sports Med 2019;37:84-93
Published online September 1, 2019;  https://doi.org/10.5763/kjsm.2019.37.3.84
© 2019 The Korean Society of Sports Medicine.

Songjun Kim, Meehee Won, Sunghoon Hur, Kyungjun An, Jongsam Lee

Research Center for Exercise and Sport Science, Daegu University, Gyeongsan, Korea
Correspondence to: Jongsam Lee
Research Center for Exercise and Sport Science, Daegu University, 201 Daegudae-ro, Jillyang-eup, Gyeongsan 38453, Korea
Tel: +82-53-850-6083, Fax: +82-53-850-6089, E-mail: jlee@daegu.ac.kr

*This study was supported by the 2018 Daegu University Research Grants.
Received April 17, 2019; Revised July 10, 2019; Accepted July 16, 2019.
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
 Abstract
Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the changes of contraction patterns and the differences of activities in trunk muscles during dynamic balance (multidirectional tilting exercise).
Methods: Eight physically active male subjects participated in the study. Tilting exercises were included by four directions (i.e., forward, backward, left, and right side), and were undertaken at three different tilting degrees (i.e., 10째, 20째, and 30째). They performed two occasions of tilting exercise, separated by 6-week time interval. Surface electromyography system was used for record of any signals produced by muscles which normalized as percentage of maximum voluntary isometric contraction.
Results: There were no statistically significant different interactive effects in any of muscles between two factors (time vs. degree). However, we identified significant main effects of degrees (among 10째, 20째, and 30째) in muscle activations during maintaining with forward tilting (left and right longissimus, multifidus), backward tilting (left and right rectus abdominis, external oblique), left side tilting (right rectus abdominis, external oblique, longissimus, multifidus), right side tilting (left rectus abdominis, external oblique, longissimus, multifidus).
Conclusion: Findings from this study allow the multidirectional tilting exercise to be considered as suitable for ameliorate muscle balance by inducing co-contraction in trunk muscles.
Keywords : Contraction, Electromyogram, Pattern, Stabilization
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