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Relationship between Hamstring Muscle Thickness and Knee Flexion Torque and Rate of Torque Development
Korean J Sports Med 2019;37:178-183
Published online December 1, 2019;  https://doi.org/10.5763/kjsm.2019.37.4.178
© 2019 The Korean Society of Sports Medicine.

Eunwook Chang1, Soul Cheon1, Hyung-Pil Jun2

1Department of Kinesiology, Inha University, Busan, 2Department of Physical Education, Dong-A University, Busan, Korea
Correspondence to: Hyung-Pil Jun
Department of Physical Education, Dong-A University, 37 Nakdong-daero 550beon-gil, Saha-gu, Busan 49315, Korea
Tel: +82-51-200-7817, Fax: +82-51-200-7805 E-mail: hjun@dau.ac.kr
*This study was supported by Inha University Research Grant (57836-01).
Received October 18, 2019; Revised November 25, 2019; Accepted November 25, 2019.
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
 Abstract
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between hamstring muscle thickness and knee flexion peak torque, and rate of torque development (RTD) calculated during 050 ms (RTD50) and 0200 ms (RTD200).
Methods: Thirty-six active individuals' dominant side hamstring thickness were measured using portable ultrasound device. Participants performed maximal isometric voluntary contraction (MVIC) of knee flexion. Peak torque was identified as the maximum torque during MVIC testing. RTD was calculated initial 50 ms and 200 ms after the onset of joint torque. Pearson셲 correlation (r) coefficients were utilized to assess relationships between muscle thickness and knee flexion peak torque, RTD50 and RTD200. The significant level of hypothesis verification is set-up as 慣=0.05.
Results: Greater peak torque and RTD200 was associated with greater muscle thickness of semitendinosus and semimembranosus (p<0.05). Greater RTD50 was associated with greater muscle thickness of semitendinosus only. Biceps femoris thickness was not associated with knee flexion peak torque, RTD50, and RTD200.
Conclusion: These results suggest that the training specific hamstring muscle (medial hamstrings) for improving muscle thickness would be effective for increasing knee flexion peak torque and RTD.
Keywords : Hamstring, Muscle thickness, Peak torque, Performance, Rate of torque development
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