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Objective versus Self-reported Physical Activity and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors
Korean J Sports Med 2020;38:28-36
Published online March 1, 2020;  https://doi.org/10.5763/kjsm.2020.38.1.28
© 2020 The Korean Society of Sports Medicine.

Hoyong Sung1, Jungjun Lim1, Junbae Mun2, Yeonsoo Kim1

1Department of Physical Education, Seoul National University, Seoul,
2Department of Physical Education, Korea Military Academy, Seoul, Korea
Correspondence to: Yeonsoo Kim
Department of Physical Education, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 08826, Korea
Tel: +82-2-880-7794, Fax: +82-2-872-2867, E-mail: kys0101@snu.ac.kr
Received September 26, 2019; Revised October 24, 2019; Accepted December 9, 2019.
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
 Abstract
Purpose: The main purpose of this study was to compare the relationships between physical activity (measured using an accelerometer vs. self-reported) and cardiovascular disease risk factors. Differences in accelerometry physical activity between 10-minute bouts and total bouts were also compared.
Methods: Data originated from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Logistic regression was used to predict cardiovascular disease risk from physical activity levels.
Results: Self-reported physical activity could not significantly predict the odds of having cardiovascular risk. However, the insufficiently active group classified according to the total-bout physical activity had significantly greater odds of having hypertension or prehypertension (odds ratio [OR], 1.35; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.001.82), diabetes mellitus (OR, 1.77; 95% CI, 1.013.19), and dyslipidemia (OR, 1.65; 95% CI, 1.172.36) than the highly active group. Regarding the 10-minute bout physical activity, the inactive group had significantly greater odds of having only hypertension or prehypertension (OR, 1.67; 95% CI, 1.022.76) than the highly active group.
Conclusion: Total-bout physical activity measured using an accelerometer could significantly predict the cardiovascular disease risk compared to 10-minute bout physical activity. However, self-reported physical activity could not significantly predict the cardiovascular disease risk.
Keywords : Cardiovascular diseases, Fitness trackers, Health, Risk assessment, Self report
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